Publications

If Biden wants to work with Mexico on migration and asylum, he might start talking to Mexican NGOs (2021)

The Washington Post

Kevin Cole; Zaid Hydari; Ana Martín Gil; Kelsey Norman

This article highlights the need for increased involvement of national-level NGOs in Mexico within the scope of regional responses to migration and asylum management.

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Beyond Refuge: Advancing Legal Protections for Rohingya Communities in Bangladesh (2021)

Refugee Solidarity Network (RSN); Bangladesh Legal Aid Service Trust (BLAST)

Researched and written as part of a multi-year research project with Refugee Solidarity Network's partner Bangladesh Legal Aid Service Trust (BLAST), this report examines relevant national laws and policies and outlines how they may be applied to improve the current situation of Rohingya refugees (and in some instances of other non-citizen groups) in Bangladesh.

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Strengthening Mexico’s Asylum System through Cross-Border Civil Society Engagement (2021)

Rice University Baker Institute for Public Policy

Kevin Cole; Zaid Hydari; Ana Martín Gil; Kelsey Norman

Based on the results of a survey conducted in March 2021, we argue that Mexico's asylum system can be strengthened by bolstering transnational cooperation between Mexican civil society organizations and U.S. policymakers and NGOs.

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The Peril and Potential of Ambiguity: How National Laws and Policies Can Strengthen and Protect the Rights of Rohingya Refugees (2021)

Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law

Sumaiya Islam; Coline Schupfer; Zaid Hydari; Alex Zetes; Kevin Cole

Against a backdrop of toughening governmental stances towards refugees, migrants, and stateless persons in the Asia-Pacific region, there is a renewed urgency to consider possibilities for the expansion of protection and access to rights and services to those who normally face exclusion. Drawing on national case law, policy developments and other practices in six major host countries in the region, this article highlights instances in which, despite not being party to the 1951 Refugee Convention, states have extended rights to non-citizens and thereby signalled acceptance of key refugee rights norms. In examining these precedents, the article demonstrates the possibility of expanding protection outside of the international refugee law framework, and intends to provide inspiration for the progressive realisation of rights for displaced Rohingya communities across the region, as well as for other non-citizen communities facing similar challenges.

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About Me - Publications